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Well, Firaxis is apparently not done with Civilization VI. They will be releasing new DLC packs with new game modes, new civilizations, and new leaders through March of 2021. The first such "New Frontiers" pack released in May of 2020 and included two new civilizations: the Maya and Gran Colombia. As usual, I try to give priority for my strategy guides to civilizations and leaders who have never been depicted as playable in the Civilization games before. In this case, we have a civilization that has been in previous games with a leader who has not, and a leader who has been in a previous game attached to a civilization that has not. I'm going to give priority to the leader who seems more straightforward to play, so that I can get this guide out to my loyal fans as quickly as possible. I will thus start by covering Simón Bolívar of Gran Colombia. Simón Bolívar appeared as a leader of New Spain in Civilization IV: Colonization, but has never been included as a leader in a mainstream Civilization game. And Gran Colombia is making its first appearance in the series as a playable faction.

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For future releases that may include multiple leaders, I may put up polls on Patreon to let my Patrons decide which civ or leader to cover first. I may also put up polls asking if my Patrons would prefer that I make guides focused on the new game modes. So if you would like to vote on which content you would prefer to see sooner, I hope you'll consider supporting the creation of this content on Patreon.

Following Simón Bolívar's victory at New Granada in the Colombian War of Independence against Spain, political leaders of the colonies in Colombia and Venezuela established the Republic of Colombia (now known as "Gran Colombia") -- even though the War of Independence was still ongoing. The federal republic divided its territory into 12 "departments", each headed by an intendant (some of whom were also commandante generals in the military), with the nation as a whole being governed by an executive branch with a president and vice president. The country only survived 12 years before dissolving over in-fighting between federalists and centralists in its ruling parties.

Gran Colombia's president, Simón Bolívar, had a vision of all the former Spanish and Portuguese colonies of Latin America being independent republics that cooperated in a league (similar in principle to the modern-day European Union) with a centralized parliamentary assembly and unified policy towards European colonial powers. The treaty was only ratified by Gran Colombia, and Bolívar's dream faded. A few years later, he became ill and died of tuberculosis, and his nation of Gran Colombia died the following year. Before he died, it is said that Bolívar stated that "America is ungovernable", as he became jaded towards the end by all the bickering and political in-fighting that had dominated Gran Colombia's brief existence. Though he failed to unite the entirety of Latin America, his prominent role in liberating Latin American countries from Spanish rule has him regarded as a father figure of many South American countries. The nations of Bolivia and the Bolivian Republic of Venezuela are named in his honor, and their currencies are know (respectively) as "boliviano" and "bolívar".

DISCLAIMER:
Civilization VI is still a "living game". Strategies for the game (and for specific leaders and civs) may change as Firaxis applies balance patches, introduces new features, or expands the game through further DLC or expansion packs, or as the Civ community discovers new strategies or exploits. As such, the following strategy guide may change from time to time. I will try to keep it up-to-date, and will make notations whenever changes are made. I'll also post links in the official 2K forums and CivFanatics, where I'll also report any changes made. If possible and practical, I will try to retain the original content of the strategy for posterity.

I welcome any feedback or suggestions that readers wish to offer. Feel free to post on the linked forums, or by posting a comment at the bottom of the page.

This guide is up to date as of the release of the "New Frontiers" Maya and Gran Colombia DLC pack (May 2020) (ver. 1.0.1.501)

Simón Bolívar is built to be an aggressive leader in Civilization VI who should use his units' extra movement, and his free Commandante Generals each era to wage lightning warfare against his enemies.

Civilization VI - Simon Bolivar of Gran Colombia

Simón Bolívar of Gran Colombia's uniques in Civilization VI

Civilization VI - Gran Colombia flag

Gran Colombia capital start bias: none.

Gran Colombian civilization unique: Ejêrcito Patriota

"+1 Movement for all units. Promoting a unit does not end that unit's turn."

Gran Colombia is going to give other militaristic civilzations (such as Scythia, Norway, Macedon, Zulu, Hungary, and others) a run for their money. This civilization can engage in lightning warfare that will likely make them one of the most potent domination civilizations in the game. Every unit of Gran Colombia has an extra movement speed. This allows them to quickly move and surround enemy units for flanking bonuses, as well as allowing them to more quickly traverse rough terrain to escape from combat or to pursue or ambush a fleeing enemy. It will also give your early units an edge in exploration that may result in finding more Tribal Villages before your rivals can claim their rewards, and meeting more city states for free envoys.

Perhaps even more threatening is the ability to move or attack after taking a promotion. Promoting a unit heals it 50 HP. Normally, you would have to take the promotion and the heal at the expense of not being able to attack with the unit that turn. Gran Colombia does not have to make the tough decision between the insta-heal and pressing an attack, as they can promote the unit, heal it, and then make a follow-up attack all in the same turn. This can dramatically turn the tide of a battle.

Settlers will be more likely to win races to hotly-contested real estate.

This ability also has non-military applications, as the movement speed is also granted to civilian and religious units. Settlers will be able to more quickly travel to favorable tiles for founding new cities. This will help them beat other civs to those locations, and also found the cities a few turns earlier than they otherwise would have been founded, giving them a headstart on becoming productive. Builders and Military Engineers will similarly be able to quickly traverse Gran Colombian territory to improve those distant cities. You can train Builders in highly-productive core cities and more quickly move them to your developing frontier cities. Apostles and Spies are also capable of taking a promotion and then still moving or using an action on the same turn.

Simón Bolívar's leader unique: Campaña Admirable

"Earn a Commandante General when the game enters a new era."

Civilization VI - Simon Bolivar portrait

Simón Bolívar gets a free unique general whenever the game enters a new era. Note that you do not get a Commandante General for the era in which you start the game. This means you do not get an ancient era Commandante General, nor do you receive a backlog of free Commandante Generals when you begin a game with a later-era start. The Commandante General that you receive will be randomized each era, and there is [currently] no U.I. that tells you which general you will receive next. Each Commandante General also has a unique ability, so you won't know exactly what you'll be getting until you get it. This can make it a bit hard to plan ahead, as the unique abilities of each Commandante General varies considerably.

Bolívar is guaranteed to get a general each era, regardless of whether you bothered to build Encampments or not, and these Commandante Generals do not replace the normal Great General great people. If you decide to build Encampments, you will earn points towards normal Great Generals as well. If Simón Bolívar has both Great Generals and his unique Commandante Generals in range of military units, their effects will stack, granting even more combat strength and (with Ejêrcito Patriota) up to +3 movement. This can be further increased late in the game with Supply Convoy support units, for a total of +4 movement.

Unique building: Hacienda

Game Info:

"Unlocks the Builder ability to construct a Hacienda, unique to Gran Colombia.
+2 Gold, +1 Production, and +1 Housing. +1 Food for every 2 adjacent Plantations (increases to every Plantation after discovering Replaceable Parts). Plantations and Haciendas receive +1 Production for every 2 adjacent Haciendas (increases to every Hacienda after discovering Rapid Deployment). Can only be built on plains, plains hills, grasslands, and grassland hills.
"

Civilization VI - Hacienda
 

Requirements: Mercantilism civic,
must be built by a Builder,
can only be built on plains and grasslands (including hills).

Cost: 1 Builder charge.

Effects:
+2 Gold, +1 Production, +1 Housing,
+1 Food for every 2 adjacent Plantations
(increases to every Plantation after Replaceable Parts),
Plantations and Haciendas receive +1 Production for every 2 adjacent Haciendas
(increases to every Hacienda after Rapid Deployment).

The Hacienda can only be built on plains and grasslands (including hills) and benefits from adjacent Plantations and other Haciendas. Plantation resources are most likely to be found in rainforest tiles, which means Gran Colombia favors expanding within the tropical regions of the map. Hacienda should be built in clusters around (and between) Plantations whenever possible in order to maximize the yield of both the Hacienda and the plantation.

The Hacienda requires that you first chop down any underlying woods or rainforest, so it might be a good idea to have the governor Magnus established in your city if practical. Chopping rainforest will also potentially leave you with fewer adjacency bonuses for your Campus districts, so you'll have to decide if the extra yield from the Hacienda is more important to you than any potential bonus research from an adjacent Campus. Campuses only get a bonus for every two adjacent rainforest, so if you have an odd number of rainforest tiles adjacent to the Campus, there is no harm in cutting one of them down to make room for a Hacienda, and doing so is highly recommended if the Hacienda would be adjacent to one or more Plantations.

Unique unit: Commandante General

Civilization VI - Commandante General icon

Game Info: "A special type of great person only available to Simón Bolívar. Each has a unique ability, including a passive effect, and a retire effect."

 
Civilization VI - commandante General unit portrait
 

Requirements: entering a new era
Replaces: none.
Obsoleted: N/A.
Upgrades to: N/A.

Cost: free at start of each era.
Maintenance Cost: none.

Promotion Class: N/A,
Attack Type: N/A,
Movement Speed: 4.

Passive Bonuses:
+1 Movement and +5 Combat Strength to military units within 2 tiles.

Retire Bonuses:
(see list below).

Every Commandante General has the same passive effect of increasing Combat Strength of nearby units by +5 and granting them +1 movement (similar to regular Great Generals). Since Gran Colombia is not prohibited from acquiring Great Generals, the combat modifier and movement bonus stacks between Commandante Generals and Great Generals, which can lead to exceptionally strong and fast units.

Commandante General bonuses stack with
regular Great General bonuses.

The retire effects of each Commandante General is as follows:

José Antonia Páez: +4 Combat strength to all Heavy and Light Cavalry units within 2 tiles.

Francisco de Paula Santander: Grants a Governor Title (Rise & Fall or Gathering Storm). In vanilla, he provides a random civic.

José Félix Ribas: Opposing units within 2 tiles lose 30 HP.

Strategy: José Félix Ribas can be a great Commandante to keep in your own cities. If a rival surprise declares on you and a carpet of units comes out of nowhere, you can march Ribas right up to the enemy troops and retire him to knock down their HP, then use your own units and city bombardment to finish them off and potentially wipe out the entire invasion force with minimal casualties. If you see a flotilla of embarked troops and naval escorts at your borders, you can get even more bang for your buck by hurting stacked units. Alternatively, he can be very valuable when invading an enemy that has you outnumbered. However, using Ribas in enemy territory is much riskier, as the opponent can easily retreat his or her units back into their cities or encampments and heal them.

Antonio Jose de Sucre: Instantly creates the strongest unit you can build. This unit receives a free promotion. In Gathering Storm, this unit requires no resource maintenance.

Strategy: Antonio Jose de Sucre will create the highest melee strength land unit that you have unlocked. Use Antonio Jose de Sucre to instantly upgrade a unit on the fronts after researching a tech that unlocks a powerful new unit. This is best used to create a unit that requires resource maintenance (such as an Infantry or Tank, which requires 1 oil per turn in maintenance). I am uncertain whether the lack of resource maintenance excludes the unit from emitting carbon. If you know for sure, please let us know in the comments!

Gregor MacGregor: Grants 1 promotion level to a military land unit and grants gold equal to 50% of the purchase cost of the unit.

Santiago Mariño: +4 Combat strength to all melee and anti-cavalry units within 2 tiles.

Mariano Montilla: +4 Combat strength against district defenses for all units within 2 tiles.

Strategy: Use this ability prior to invading and conquering an enemy's cities. Works best if you have some siege units in range, as they will help bring down walls much faster.

Antonio Narińo: +1 trade route capacity and spawns a Trader unit in the nearest friendly city.

Manual Piar: +7 Combat strength to a single unit.

Rafael Urdaneta: All your units within 2 tiles regain all of their movement and can attack as if they had not made attacks this turn.

Strategy: This ability is best used to launch a surprise attack against a fortified border, or to make a final push against an enemy strong hold. It is also best used in conjunction with lots of ranged or siege units, since they will be able to make ranged attacks without risking taking damage. Alternatively, it can be used to make a cavalry raid, and then get your units out of dodge before they are trapped and killed.

Unique unit: Llanero

Civilization VI - llanero icon

Game Info: "Gran Colombian industrial era unique unit that replaces the Cavalry. Low maintenance cost. +4 Combat Strength for every adjacent Llanero. Fully heals when in range of a Commandante General that activates its retire ability."

 
Civilization VI - llanero unit portrait
 

Requirements: Military Science technology
Replaces: Cavalry.
Obsoleted: Synthetic Materials technology.
Upgrades to: Helicopter.

Cost: 330 Production / 1320 Gold / ??? Faith [Standard speed].
Resource Cost: 20 Horses [Standard Speed].
Maintenance Cost: 2 Gold per turn [Standard speed] (-3 from Cavalry).

Promotion Class: light cavalry,
Attack Type: melee,
Melee Strength: 62,
Movement Speed: 5.

 

Bonuses:
Ignores enemy zone of control,
+4 Combat Strength for every adjacent Llanero,
Fully heals if in range of a Commandante General that activates its retire ability..

The Llanero is a Cavalry replacement that will specialize in swarming the enemy. It has the same base combat strength as the Cavalry, but the Llanero benefits from having adjacent Llanero accompanying them, and from having nearby Commandante Generals. The Llanero only have to be adjacent to each other to gain their combat bonus; they do not have to be adjacent to the enemy unit being attacked. Having two Llanero adjacent to both each other and the enemy unit will grant both the Llanero's bonus, and a normal flanking bonus. However, you can also place wounded Llanero in a back line such that they are out of danger of enemy attack, but still providing the adjacency bonus to the front-line Llanero.

With the Ejêrcito Patriota national ability and a nearby Commandante General (or regular Great General), a Llanero will have a whopping seven movement! (Eight movement if you also have a regular Great General in range!) Just make sure that you remember to move up all your Llanero to support each other, and move up your general for the additional combat bonus before you actually attack an enemy unit.

As Cavalry, they also ignore zone of control (while still projecting zone of control of their own), so they can race behind the enemy lines to pillage multiple tiles, plunder trade routes, or disrupt enemy movements.

Conquest through the ages with Simón Bolívar of Gran Colombia

Out of the gates, Gran Colombia's units start with an extra movement point. Your starting Warrior will have 3 movement, allowing it to more quickly explore open terrain, or to move through rough terrain without necessarily having to stop. Scouts will start with 4 movement, which may allow them to explore the furthest reaches of your home continent before needing to be recalled to upgrade to Skirmishers. The extra movement will also help them to escape barbarian pursuit, and should help them to survive more easily.

You'll be able to explore quickly due to the increased speed of your units.

You should focus your exploration on the tropical regions of the map, since that is where most of the rainforest and plantation resources will be. Settling in these locations early will ensure that you'll have plenty of viable land for constructing Haciendas later in the game. But if a rival beats you to primo rainforest real estate, it's not that big of a deal, since you should be able to leverage your military advantages to either capture their cities and claim them as your own, or raze them to make room for your own cities later.

This focus on plantation resources will mean that Goddes of Festivals (+1 culture for each Plantation) is a good Pantheon choice, and you'll want to research Irrigation technology sooner rather than later. You'll probably also want to invest in the governor Magnus early (if you have either expansion) because you'll likely be chopping a lot of that rainforest eventually to make room for Haciendas. You'll also want to look to build your Campus districts adjacent to mountains, geothermal fissures, and/or reefs, rather than rainforests, since a lot of the rainforest is likely to eventually be chopped. However, the chopping won't need to happen till later in the game, so an early Campus in the middle of a blanket of rainforest will still provide a solid early game advantage.

Recruiting the governor Liang early so that you can put her in a city that you will use as your primary Builder-production city. Use Serfdom to grant additional charges to your Builders and spam as many as you can. Adopting the Monumentality Golden Age dedication will allow you to also purchase Builders with faith. If you have lots of rainforest to chop, I recommend focusing on chopping one city at a time in order to make room for your Haciendas. Move Magnus from city to city, give him time to establish, then chop all the rainforest and woods adjacent to Plantation resources for large yields of food and production. Then move Magnus to the next city and repeat. You don't have to wait until Haciendas are available to do this.

Chop rainforests adjacent to Plantation resources in the city with Magnus to make room for Haciendas.

When the game enters the classical era, you'll receive your first free Commandante General. Which general you get will be random, and you won't know which one he will be until you actually get him. This can make it difficult to plan ahead, but the chart above provides some advice on how each Commandante General can be used. Regardless of what the general's unique retire ability is, they will all provide the passive effect of boosting nearby units' combat strength and movement speed, so unless the general has a retire ability that would be exceptionally powerful to use now, it's best to wait till the next era before you consider retiring him.

From what I can tell, none of the Commandante Generals' passive boosts are exclusive to units of any particular era(s) (unlike the regular Great Generals). This means that when you get the next free Commandante General for entering the next era, you are free to chose which general(s) to keep using as generals, and which one(s) to retire. You can even retire the most recently-acquired Commandante General and keep using the older ones if the newer general has a more immediately-beneficial retire ability.

You can also freely build Encampment districts in your cities and earn great person points towards regular Great Generals. Doing so gives you the added option of using the regular Great Generals for their combat bonuses and retiring the Commandante Generals for their superior retire abilities -- or vice versa.

With the free Commandante Generals, I can retire Sun Tzu for the early great work of writing!

With the added movement from Ejêrcito Patriota and the free Commandante General(s), you can engage in blitz warfare as early as the classical or medieval eras. Make sure that you research the Military Tradition civic so that you'll get flanking and support bonuses for surrounding enemy units, and you should consider adopting the Oligarchy government for your early wars. Having Oligarchy adopted when you build your Government Plaza will also grant you access to the Oligarchic Legacy wildcard policy, which you can slot into later governments to maintain your oligarchy combat bonus.

One of the unit types that will greatly benefit from the free extra movement will be siege weapons. Catapults will be much more formidable against early walls, since they'll be able to move into range of the city and also shoot in the same turn (before the city is able to make an attack against the Catapult). Being able to take a promotion and still attack (rather than retreat and take a promotion) will also help keep Catapults in the fight.

Civilization VI - horse resource

In general, the ability to promote a unit and then still take actions with that unit can turn the tide of many battles. You can take a promotion to heal your unit after defending, and then use that same unit to counter-attack and finish off the enemy who attacked you.

You can maximize your mobility and lightning strike capability by prioritizing the acquisition of horse resources early so that you can train mounted units. Consider adopting the Maneuver policy to pump out a number of Horsemen and Chariots early. Even a simple Horseman will have 6 total movement if accompanied by a Commandante General. The extra movement and combat strength will help it to survive behind the lines (especially if supported by additional Horsemen), allowing it to attack the enemy's backline of ranged units or pillage and plunder the enemy's territory. When you upgrade the Chariots to Knights, they will also become devastating quick-strike weapons.

Combine your experienced Llanero with stock Llanero to make swarms of Llanero corps and armies.

Upon entering the medieval era, you'll have a second Commandante General, which will allow you to keep one general attached to your main infantry army of swords and bows, and also attach another general to your mounted raiding party of Coursers and Knights. When you get into the industrial era and research Military Tactics technology, you'll be able to upgrade your Coursers to Llanero, which when used en masse and supported by a Commandante General, will be an exceptionally mobile and dangerous force. You can ride this mobile force to a Domination Victory if you see fit. And if you ever find yourself in a pinch with your cavalry raids, you can always retire the nearby Commandante General to heal your Llanero and help them to survive the incursion into enemy territory. It's fine, you'll get another Commandante General soon enough!

If you own either or both expansions, the biggest challenge towards a Domination Victory at this point likely won't be the opposing armies; it will probably be loyalty. Haciendas will provide extra food and housing, which will help cities to grow faster and fortify their loyalty. So take Builders (and maybe Military Engineers?) along with your armies to quickly repair damaged improvements and spam Haciendas in conquered cities. Supplement the Haciendas with trade routes to further grow the city's population, and fortify the city's loyalty with governors and loyalty-improving policies such as Limitanei, Praetorium, and Colonial Offices. Saving your conquests for when you are in a golden age will also help.

Sipping lemonade on the Hacienda porch

Despite a number of substantial military advantages, Gran Colombia can also devote itself to [relatively] peaceful existence with its neighbors. For example, if your classical and medieval Commandantes are Antonio Narińo (+1 trade route) and Francisco de Paula Santander (+1 governor title) (in either order), you may chose not to engage in conquest right away. Both these generals provide social or economic benefits that make them worth retiring immediately, rather than using them as generals.

Commandantes like Antonio Nariño are
worth retiring immediately.

Instead, you can focus on religious play. Gran Colombia's religious units also benefit from Simón Bolívar's Ejêrcito Patriota ability. They have +1 movement, which allows them to more quickly move to distant cities to spread Gran Colombia's religion sooner. Apostles will also be able to take their free starting promotion when they are trained, and still be able to move and use their abilities that same turn. This can make a huge difference when engaging in theological combat, as you can potentially buy the Apostle, take a promotion (hopefully the Debater promotion), and then start attacking the rival Missionaries or Apostles before they can start spreading religion to your cities.

When you progress into the renaissance and industrial era, the Hacienda improvement can be mass spammed throughout plain and grassland tiles of your empire, and can provide decent sums of food, gold, and production. You should have many plantation luxuries due to your jungle start bias, which you can sell to other civilizations throughout the game for money and to improve diplomatic relations.

This will allow Gran Colombia to dedicate itself more towards economic development, while using its military as a defensive deterrent and/or world-police force. You can use your military to liberate captured cities or complete military emergencies in order to earn Diplomatic Favor and build friendships and alliances with other civilizations. The speed of your armies will help you mobilize them all over the world to complete emergencies and earn some Diplomatic Victory points.

Build Haciendas in clusters around plantations to improve their yield..

As the game nears its end, your Spies will also be slightly more effective. They also have the ability to take a promotion and also move or take an action in the same turn. This will allow them to take a promotion and then get right back into a mission after the successful completion of their previous mission. This can be useful for slowing down an opponent's attempt at a victory by sabotaging their Industrial Hubs, Spaceports, Dams, etc.

Playing against Simón Bolívar of Gran Colombia

Simón Bolívar's A.I. agenda: Carabobo

"Likes civilizations with highly-promoted units. Dislikes civilizations who have few highly-promoted units."

Being loaded with military advantages, Simón Bolívar can be an intimidating neighbor. His units will be able to move faster, he will always have generals available, and his units can promote themselves for the insta-heal and still attack on the same turn! OK, good luck. Bye.

In all seriousness though, you can't do anything to take these bonuses away, you'll just have to cope with them. This will mean adopting social policies that speed up unit production (such as Agoge or Maneuver) and training a sizeable military force of your own, and lots of bombardment potential from city and encampment walls. Hide strong ranged units away in cities and encampments in order to bombard Gran Colombia's units from relative safety. Try to finish off Colombia's wounded units whenever possible so that they can't promote themselves to insta-heal and then continue attacking you.

An A.I.-controlled Simón Bolívar will also likely favor mounted units, which means you may want to train a sizeable force of anti-cavalry units to patrol or fortify your borders. Camp some anti-cav units on your valuable tiles (such as strategic resources or high-yield districts) in order to prevent a fast-moving Colombian cavalry unit from sprinting into your territory and pillaging such tiles.

Try proposing joint wars with other leaders against Simón Bolívar in order to force him to commit his units to multiple fronts. Also use emergencies to try to keep him in check. But be careful that Bolívar doesn't use these conflicts as opportunities to conquer your allies.

Bolívar may look down on you if your army is less experienced than his.

If you are playing as an early war-rush civ (such as Sumeria, Scythia, Nubia, or Aztec) you may want to prioritize defeating Gran Colombia in the ancient or classical era, before Gran Colombia has access to multiple Commandante Generals or the strategic resources necessary to train a more advanced fighting force.

Alternatively, if you can befriend him, he can be a worthwhile military ally. And since he likes civilizations who have well-promoted militaries, one of the best ways to become his friend is to fight a lot of wars. Having Encampments with Barracks / Stables and Armories will allow you to produce units that will get promoted faster. If you can get him into a join war against a common foe (so that he doesn't hate you because of the grievances you create against that foe), and get a few of your units into the third or fourth tier of promotions, he'll likely be favorable to you for most of the game. You can also fight against a city state, or even collect promotions from combat against barbarians. Just remember that if you're going for a Domination victory, you'll have to fight him sooner or later.

I believe that Bolívar's A.I. will check the promotion level of your army against the promotion level of his army when evaluating his agenda. This means that he is one of several leaders in the game who may (ironically) like you more if you engage in conflict with him. By killing his experienced units and promoting your own in short-lived border skirmishes, you can potentially turn him from an enemy into a friend after peace is declared, while having simultaneously limited his risk as a military threat.

Discussions & Change Log

Thanks for reading. I hope this guide helps you to build a Gran Colombian civilization that will stand the test of time!

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These strategy guides for Civilization VI have been taking longer to research and write than I would like. Part of this is due to the fact that I'm not as familiar and experienced with Civ VI as I was with Civ V when I started writing strategy guides for that game, so I have to spend more time trying to learn the different mechanics and rules associated with each new civ that I play. I also have a lot more things competing for my time.

If you enjoy this strategy guide, and would like to see more like it, please consider making a contribution and become a Patron on Patreon. As a Patron, you'll have the ability to vote on which civilization(s) you'd like to see a strategy guide for next, will receive early previews of certain content, and will have an opportunity to discuss or contribute to its development. With some additional funding, I could dedicate more time to writing guides like this one, and can maybe even branch out into more video content on Youtube.

In any case, feel free to comment and share, or discuss you Gran Colombia strategies in the CivFanatics forums at:
https://forums.civfanatics.com/threads/
a-general-strategy-for-simon-bolivar-of-gran-colombia.658642/

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